My name is Javier Arce, comme tout le monde. I'm an illustrator and [code] writer based in Madrid, working to make CartoDB the best cartographic and storytelling platform out there.

Hey, people that read books and other things that look like books but are not necessarily books, if you’re in Madrid this Friday, April 11, come and say hi to Pajaro, a new publishing house made by (and in connivance with) some of my favorite people in the world. 

And you know what, I’ll be there too! Disguised as a dodo, eating sandwiches and taking pictures. And when I say disguised as a dodo I mean drinking…  disguised as a dodo.

More details in the Facebook page of the event.

Hey, people that read books and other things that look like books but are not necessarily books, if you’re in Madrid this Friday, April 11, come and say hi to Pajaro, a new publishing house made by (and in connivance with) some of my favorite people in the world.

And you know what, I’ll be there too! Disguised as a dodo, eating sandwiches and taking pictures. And when I say disguised as a dodo I mean drinking… disguised as a dodo.

More details in the Facebook page of the event.

And there are certain kinds of visual acts which I’m always hoping to stumble upon. Unusual juxtapositions, surprising color combinations, new modes of visual expression…I am always interested by anything graphical that strikes me as (this is difficult to put into words) excitingly wrong. There is a cool-factor to certain images that lie just on this side of disagreeable…pictorial effects that make me think “this will bother a lot of unimaginative people.” Whenever I see something like that, a piece of art or graphic design that has that special kind of wrongness about it, I think “I need to do something like this myself.” Attendant to this is always the feeling of “in the future, this will be done a lot.” In other words, today’s ugly is tomorrow’s beautiful.
— From this interview with the great Peter Mendelsund.
Via this post by Ben Pieratt (who is also great)

A must-see rundown of the ways the NSA is spying on, well, everybody on this planet. It includes descriptions of hardware used to monitor mobile devices and networks, some details on parcel interception and cancer-inducing wave generators, several pictures of Austin Powers, and other scary stuff. What’s not to like?

The rest of the 30th Chaos Communication Congress talks can be watched here.